RETRACTED: Teaching in Rural Indonesian Schools: Teachers’ Challenges

  • Mia Febriana Universitas Sebelas Maret, English Education Department
  • Joko Nurkamto Universitas Sebelas Maret, English Education Department
  • Dewi Rochsantiningsih Universitas Sebelas Maret, English Education Department
  • Anggri Muhtia Universitas Sebelas Maret, English Education Department
Keywords: SM-3T, English language teaching, rural areas, teacher professional development

Abstract

This article has been retracted: please see IJoLTe publication etichs on duties of authors, section Multiple, Redundant or Concurrent Publication (https://online-journal.unja.ac.id/index.php/IJoLTE/Ethics)

This article has been retracted as the initiative of the editor in chief as the result of violations of publication ethics. The article doing multiple submission. If you want to get the article, please visit to: https://ijmmu.com/index.php/ijmmu/article/view/305

International Journal of Language Teaching and Education takes a very strong view on this matter and apologies are offered to readers of the journal for this problems.

Regards,

IJoLTe Team

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References

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[8] OECD, Asian Development Bank (2015). Reviews of national policies for education: Education in Indonesia - rising to the challenge. Retrieved from https://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/publication/156821/education-indonesia-rising-challenge.pdf.
[9] Prouty, R. (2012). We like being taught: A Study on teacher absenteeism in Papua and West Papua. UNCEN – UNIPA – SMERU – BPS – UNICEF.
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Published
2018-07-31
How to Cite
Febriana, M., Nurkamto, J., Rochsantiningsih, D., & Muhtia, A. (2018). RETRACTED: Teaching in Rural Indonesian Schools: Teachers’ Challenges. International Journal of Language Teaching and Education, 2(2), 87-96. https://doi.org/10.22437/ijolte.v2i2.5002